Careers

Types of work

The Human Resource Management program develops students as both generalists and specialists by offering classes in the functional HR areas and classes that cover the broader picture including employment law, strategic, and organizational management. Students learn best practices in the coordination of business and leveraging the human element.

Typically, in the early stages of a HR career a professional will be involved with tactical HR activities and compliance-related work. As a HR professional advances, they will usually have an opportunity to look at things form a strategic viewpoint. A HR professional is a supporter of the business and an advocate for employees. Successful HR professionals will link people strategies with business strategies and prove the value that human capital adds to the organization's bottom line.

HR professionals can be HR generalists or HR specialist in their career. 

HR generalists' responsibilities cover the full HR spectrum including employment and recruitment, total rewards/compensation, benefits, employee and labor relations, risk management/safety and security, training and development, diversity, policies and procedures, compliance, and organizational development.

  • Generalist positions are often titled HR assistant; HR business partner; HR generalist; HR department or branch manager; chief HR officer; people services specialist or manager.

Specialists usually possess technical knowledge and skills in specific areas of human resource management. Entry-level positions often fall within these specialties. The most common areas of specialization are:

  • Workforce Planning and Employment job titles include recruiter; recruitment and retention specialist or manager; staffing specialist or manager; chief talent manager or officer.

  • HR Development job titles include training or orientation/on-boarding specialist; career coordinator; trainer; employee development specialist or manager; leadership development specialist or manager; organizational development (OD) specialist or manager.

  • Total Rewards job titles include compensation and administrative services specialist; compensation administrators; benefit administrators; compensation analysts; benefits analyst; compensation specialist or manager.

  • Employee and Labor Relations job titles include labor relations specialist, plan personnel assistant or employee relations specialist; performance management specialist, manager or director; employee advocate; and manager of labor relations.

  • Risk Management job titles include safety specialists; employee assistance program counselors; medical program administrators; safety officer; risk management specialist or manager; and OSHA manager.

  • Other specialist job titles include human resource information systems (HRIS) specialists; global specialists and manager; HR consultant; HR instructor.

Future jobs

HR professionals contribute to business viability and success through the strategic management of human capital. In addition, the profession continues to increase its stature. The HR manager has been listed number four in the Top Ten Best Jobs in America based on a variety of factors, including job growth in the next decade, earnings potential, creativity and flexibility by MONEY Magazine and Salary.com in 2007.

Between 2007 and 2017, this occupation is expected to increase 12.4% during this period. It is estimated that there will be 82 openings annually.**

Salary examples

Salaries for HR professionals differ and are dependent upon many factors such as an organization's size, economic activity, geographic location, and profitability.

Occupations for Human Resources Management in Washington State**

Occupation Title

Employment Projections

Hourly Average

Yearly
Average

2007

2017

Change

% Chg

Human Resources Assistants

4,066

4,570

504

12.4

$18.42

$38,316.60

Employment, Recruitment, and Placement Specialists

4,356

5,369

1,013

23.3

$28.44

$59,155.20

Training and Development Specialists

3,312

3,700

388

11.7

$30.68

63,814.4

Compensation, Benefits, and Job Analysis Spec.

2,048

2,350

302

14.7

$30.40

$63,814.40

Human Res. Training, and Labor Relations Spec.

7,832

8,956

1,124

14.4

$31.25

$65,000

Compensation and Benefits Managers

473

515

42

8.9

$47.26

$98,300.80

Training and Development Managers

538

588

50

9.3

$48.59

$101,067.20

Human Resources Managers, All Other

2,066

2,300

234

11.3

$51.51

$107,140.80

Chief Executives

2,654

2,933

104

10.5

$88.83

$184,766.4

 

As of April 2009 in Washington State for all industries from SHRM*

Title

Weighted Average Yearly salary

Bonus and other Cash

Human Resources Assistant

$38,400

$2,000

Employee Benefits Administrator

$52,000

$3,400

Employment/Recruiting Representative

$56,700

$4,200

Employee Training Specialist

$54,300

$3,800

Human Resources Generalist

$62,000

$4,500

Compensation Analyst

$64,300

$5,100

Human Resources Information Systems (HRIS) Analyst

$64,600

$4,600

Employee Training Manager

$87,200

$10,100

Human Resources Manager

$89,000

$10,200

Top Corporate Compensation and Benefits Executive

$175,000

55,200

What jobs are available now?

Search these job databases for Seattle-area jobs:

* SHRM's Compensation Data Center

** Information from Occupations for Human Resources Management in Washington State 2010

 

Human Resources Generalist Salary in Seattle, WA

 

More information about the HR profession and partnership with Society of HR Management (SHRM) go to the  LWTech Student SHRM Chapter page.