Anti-Terrorism Policy

Any act of terrorism on a LWTech Campus will most assuredly have a negative impact on the psyches and the physical aspects of our every-day community life. Acts of terrorism include, but are not limited to chemical and biological threats, conventional and radiological explosive events, and nuclear blast events. While none of these situations are desirable, they are survivable. It should be noted here that in the event of a catastrophic terrorist event we may need to "shelter in place" for up to 72 hours to allow time for County, State, and Federal emergency officials to render aid. In the event of use of any weapon of mass destruction (WMD) on our campus, the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) will have complete operational control of the situation. Upon transfer to the clean-up and recovery stage, the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) will assume operational control until the event is concluded and control is returned to LWTech.

The essence of any effective response to terrorist attack is to remain calm and as clear-headed as possible; such situations call for the utmost in common sense. With that in mind, prepare to survive should you be faced with a catastrophic event.

Of the events listed above, it is important to note that only chemical, conventional explosive, and nuclear blast events are readily detectable; it is abundantly clear when these events take place. What may not be clear is the difference between a conventional and a radiological explosion as the external appearance is the same; a radiological explosion uses a conventional explosive event as a vehicle to disperse radiological agents (also known as a "dirty bomb"). Depending on the material used in a "dirty bomb," the negative effects of radiation exposure may take hours or days to manifest themselves upon humans exposed to the event. The explosion itself is obvious; the unknown part is if it is a "conventional" or "dirty" event. It is best to treat conventional explosions as potential radiation threat.

The first responder to a terrorist act will:

  1. Call 911 (on campus 9-911) then LWTech Security at #8611 or 425-739-8224.

  2. Determine, if possible, the type of event at hand.

  3. Initiate the appropriate emergency response.

  4. Assist in establishing a quarantine perimeter.

  5. Assist responding police and fire personnel.

Contamination considerations preclude a first responder's return to the general population until examined and released by health officials. Additional information may be obtained from the homeland security website to reach local, state, and federal agencies and other, valuable, anti-terrorism and emergency response information.

BIOLOGICAL EVENTS

Biological events are hard to identify immediately; often, the effects of biological agents are delayed. Biological agents may cause extreme sickness or death and may or may not be contagious to others. If a report is received of a biological event on campus:

  1. Notify 911 (on campus 9-911) then LWTech Security immediately at #8611 or 425-739-8224. LWTech Security will establish an initial quarantine perimeter of approximately 300 feet; no one will be allowed in or out of this area until cleared by officials.

  2. If the report is from your immediate area, it is important to remain there until cleared to leave by emergency response officials; to leave without clearance is to put even more people in potential danger.

  3. Public health officials will determine what type of biological event has occurred and the proper course of action; however, it is important to remember that it make take a significant amount of time to determine the exact biological agent in question. Be patient.

  4. While in the quarantine area do what you can to protect yourself. Get as far away from the event as possible, while remaining in the quarantine area, and cover your mouth and nose with layers of fabric such as cotton t-shirts, handkerchiefs, or towels. Tissue or paper towels will work if nothing else is available. When possible, wash thoroughly with soap and hot water. Remember, within the confines of your quarantine area, if possible, get upwind from the source of contamination.

  5. Note personal health symptoms as well as those around you. Write this information down if possible to pass on to health officials. Remain calm, await treatment and subsequent release.

CHEMICAL EVENTS: Chemical events involve the deliberate release of a toxic gas, liquid, or solid and may cause immediate serious illness and/or death. Chemical events are easier to identify than biological events; some common chemical event symptoms include watering of the eyes, muscular twitching, choking, breathing problems, and loss of coordination. Chemically contaminated areas may include large numbers of dead or dying people, birds, fish, or small animals. If a report is received of a chemical event on campus:

  1. Notify 911 (on campus 9-911) then LWTech Security immediately at #8611 or 425-739-8224.

  2. LWTech Security will establish an initial quarantine perimeter of approximately 300 feet; no one will be allowed in or out of this area until cleared by officials. If the event occurs at night, the perimeter may be expanded, as heavy night air does not facilitate chemical dispersion. If a wind exists, a larger perimeter will be emplaced downwind to prevent further human contamination.

  3. If the report is from your immediate area, it's important to get upwind and away from the source of contamination as quickly as possible without leaving the quarantine area. Remain there until cleared to leave by emergency response officials; to leave without clearance puts even more people in danger.

  4. If persons within a contamination area cannot identify the chemical agent, public health officials must determine the type of chemical agent and the proper course of action; however, it's important to remember: It make take significant time to determine the exact chemical agent in question. Be patient.

  5. While in the quarantine area do what you can to protect yourself. Get as far away, and upwind, from the event as possible (while remaining in the quarantine area). When possible, remove clothing and wash thoroughly; look for a hose, faucet, or other source of water. Long, continuous watering down of contaminated skin is beneficial. Use plenty of soap, but do not scrub so intensely as to scrub the chemical into your skin. Cover your mouth and nose with layers of fabric such as cotton t-shirts, handkerchiefs, tissue paper or paper towels to reduce the possibility of chemical intake into your respiratory system. Remember, within the confines of your quarantine area; get upwind from the source of contamination.

  6. Note personal health symptoms as well as those of people around you. Write this information down if possible to pass on to health officials. Remain calm, and await treatment/release.

CONVENTIONAL EXPLOSIVE EVENTS

A conventional explosive event is one that does not include the release of biological, chemical, or radiological materials. It is an event that may cause serious injury or death by way of debris hurled violently from the source of the explosion, from powerful sub- and super-sonic shock waves released as a result of the explosion, secondary building collapses and/or fires. Conventional explosive events are easy to identify; loud noise, debris flying through the air, shock waves, and fire are usual indicators of such an event.

If a report is received of a conventional explosive event on campus:

  1. Notify 911 (on campus 9-911) then LWTech Security immediately at #8611 or 425-739-8224.

  2. LWTech Security will establish an initial quarantine perimeter of approximately 300 feet; no one will be allowed in or out of this area until cleared by officials. If the event occurs at night, the perimeter may be expanded, as heavy night air may fuel fires or facilitate contamination of chemical or biological agents in the explosion area.

  3. If a report is from your immediate area, it is important to get upwind and away from the source of the explosion as quickly as possible without leaving the quarantine area. Remain there until cleared to leave by emergency response officials. To leave without clearance puts even more people in potential danger.

  4. If persons within the explosion area are unable to identify the exact location of the event, Emergency Response personnel must determine if other, secondary explosives may be in the immediate area and take the proper course of action to eliminate the danger of additional explosions; however, it is important to remember that it make take a significant amount of time to determine the exact location of additional explosive devices and the safety of the explosion area. Be patient.

  5. While in the quarantine area do what you can to protect yourself. Get as far away, and upwind, from the event as possible. When possible treat injuries with available first-aid until arrival of emergency medical personnel; wash thoroughly when possible. If necessary, cover your mouth and nose with layers of fabric such as cotton t-shirts, handkerchiefs, tissue paper or paper towels to reduce the possibility of contaminating your respiratory system from dust and smoke from the explosion. Remember, within the confines of your quarantine area, get upwind from the source of contamination.

  6. Note personal health symptoms as well as those of people around you. Write this information down if possible to pass on to health officials. Remain calm, await treatment and release.

RADIOLOGICAL EXPLOSIONS

A radiological explosion is known as a "dirty bomb." Dirty bombs use conventional explosives to disperse radiological agents. Depending on the radiological material used in a "dirty bomb," the negative effects of radiation exposure may take hours or days to manifest themselves upon those exposed to the event. The explosion itself is obvious; the unknown here is if it is a "conventional" or "dirty" event. It is best to treat all "conventional" explosions as a potential radiation threat. If a report is received of a radiological, or "dirty bomb" explosive event on campus:

  1. Notify 911 (on campus 9-911) then LWTech Security immediately at #8611 or 425-739-8224. LWTech Security will establish an initial quarantine perimeter of approximately 500 feet; no one will be allowed in or out of this area until cleared by officials. If the event occurs at night, the perimeter may be expanded to regulate radiological dispersion. If a wind exists, a larger perimeter will be emplaced downwind to prevent further human contamination.

  2. If the report is from your area, get upwind and away from the source of contamination as quickly as possible without leaving the quarantine area. Remain there until cleared to leave by emergency response officials. To leave without clearance is to put even more people in potential danger.

  3. If persons within the contamination area are unable to identify the radiological agent used, public health officials must determine the type of agent and the proper course of action; however, it is important to remember that it may take a significant amount of time to determine the exact radiological agent in question. Be patient.

  4. While in the quarantine area do what you can to protect yourself. Get as far away, and upwind, from the event as possible while remaining in the quarantine area. Shield yourself with whatever is available; buildings, cars, natural barriers are all good sources for shielding. Minimize your exposure to the radiological agent; when possible, remove clothing and wash thoroughly; look for a hose, faucet, or other source of water. Long, continuous watering down of contaminated skin and clothing is beneficial. Use plenty of soap, but do not scrub so intensely as to scrub the radiological agent into your skin. Cover your mouth and nose with layers of fabric such as cotton t-shirts, handkerchiefs, tissue paper or paper towels to reduce the possibility of radiological intake into your respiratory system. Remember, within the confines of your quarantine area; get upwind from the source of contamination, put barriers between you and the contamination, minimize the time of your exposure.

  5. Note personal health symptoms as well as those of others around you. Write this information down if possible to pass on to health officials. Remain calm, and await treatment and release.

NUCLEAR EXPLOSION

A nuclear explosion is potentially the most devastating of all terrorist threats, provided it is delivered in military proportions (a bomb or missile). A military-type nuclear blast generates massive amounts of intense light and heat and a punishing shock wave that spreads nuclear contamination into the air, water, and ground surfaces for mile and miles around. Few people have the ability to generate delivery of this type of weapon, at least one of sufficient size to cause the damage they are noted for. However, the nature of terrorism is such that we cannot preclude the threat of a devastating nuclear blast. If a report is received of a nuclear explosion on or around campus:

  1. Notify 911 (on campus 9-911) then LWTech Security immediately at #8611 or 425-739-8224. The shear destructive power of such an event precludes a response such as would be generated by conventional or radiological explosions. King County, Washington State, and US government officials will take immediate control of the situation; quarantine perimeters will likely be established as much as a mile or more from the impact zone. Survivors may not leave the quarantine area until released by officials. If a wind exists, a larger perimeter will be emplaced downwind to prevent further human impact from radiation contamination.

  2. It is important to get upwind and away from the source of contamination as quickly as possible without leaving the quarantine area. The destructive power of radiation is limited to time and distance; limit your exposure time. Stay upwind at all times. Put barriers such as buildings, cars, or natural formations between you and the source of radiation and remain there until cleared to leave by emergency response officials. To leave without clearance puts even more people in potential danger of radiation sickness. Health officials must determine the type of radiation released and the proper course of action; however, it is important to remember that it may take a significant amount of time to determine the exact radiological agent in question. Be patient.

  3. While in the quarantine area do what you can to protect yourself. Once you minimize your exposure, get as far away as possible in your quarantine area, and make appropriate use of available shielding, look for available sources of water. When possible, remove clothing and thoroughly wash your skin; long, continuous watering down of contaminated skin and clothing is beneficial. Use plenty of soap, but do not scrub so intensely as to scrub contamination into your skin. Cover your mouth and nose with layers of fabric such as cotton t-shirts, handkerchiefs, tissue paper or paper towels to reduce the possibility of contaminating your respiratory system. Remember, within the confines of your quarantine area; get upwind from the source of contamination, put barriers between you and the contamination, minimize the time of your exposure.

  4. Note personal health symptoms as well as those of people around you. Write this information down if possible to pass on to health officials. Remain calm, and await treatment and release.