Visual

The "Seeing" Learning Style

  • Visual learners can be visual/verbal (written language-oriented) or visual/nonverbal (graphics/picture-oriented).

The Visual/Verbal Style

  • You learn best when information is presented visually and in writing. You may find verbal instructions difficult.

  • You benefit from instructors who use the white board or overheads or provide an outline to follow.

  • You benefit from reading textbooks and notes.

  • You like to study by yourself in a quiet place.

  • You memorize by seeing information.

  • You see information "in your mind's eye" when trying to remember something.

Strategies for the Visual/Verbal Learner

  • Color code new information in your textbook or notes using highlighter pens.

  • Write or type out sentences and phrases that summarize key information obtained from your textbook, lecture or diagrams. Use these notes for visual review.

  • Make flashcards of vocabulary words and concepts that need to be memorized.

  • When learning mathematical or technical information, write out in sentences and key phrases your understanding of the material. When a problem involves a sequence of steps, write out in detail how to do each step.

  • Before an exam, make yourself visual reminders of information that must be memorized. Make "stick it" notes containing key words and concepts and place them in highly visible places - on your mirror, notebook, car dashboard, etc.

The Visual/Nonverbal Style

  • You learn best when information is presented visually and in a picture or design format.

  • You benefit from instructors who use visual aids such as film, video, maps and charts.

  • You benefit from information obtained from the pictures and diagrams in textbooks.

  • You like to work in a quiet room.

  • You memorize by seeing graphics and pictures.

  • When trying to remember something, you can often visualize a picture of it in your mind.

  • You may have an artistic side that enjoys visual art and design.

Strategies for the Visual/Nonverbal Learner

  • Color code new information in your textbook or notes using highlighter pens.

  • Translate words and ideas into symbols, pictures, and diagrams.

  • Mark up the margins of your textbook with key words, symbols, and diagrams.

  • Make picture flashcards of key information that needs to be memorized.

  • When learning mathematical or technical information, make charts to organize the information. When a mathematical problem involves a sequence of steps, draw a series of boxes, each containing the appropriate bit of information in sequence.

  • Use large square graph paper or a computer to assist in creating charts and diagrams that illustrate key concepts.